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Nudibranchs

Arminid & Dendronotid Cladobranchs

Arminid & Dendronotid Cladobranch Nudibranchs



Index

Sea Slugs



Side-Gilled

Side-Gilled Slugs

Umbrella Shells

Umbrella Shells

Head-shield Slugs

Head-shield Slugs

Pteropods

Pteropods

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Sea Hares

Sea Hares

Nudibranchs



Phanerobranch Dorids

Side-Gilled Slugs

Cryptobranch Discodorids

Cryptobranch Discodorids

Cryptobranch Chromodorids

Cryptobranch Chromodorids

Radula-less Dorids

Radula-less Dorids

Arminids

Arminids

Dendronotids

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Aeolids

Aeolids

Many of the unusual and interesting genera are covered here, e.g. Armina, Dermatobranchus, Bornella, Melibe, Doto.

The characteristic of this group is that all have a branched disgestive gland, as can be clearly seen in the transparent Melibe colemani. Indications are that this has evolved independantly several times and that this is not a natural group.

Arminidae



Armina and Dendrobranchus are the two main genera in this family. There are a number of large and spectacular members in both genera. They all feed on sea pens or soft corals, or occasionally gorgonians.

Armina cf. occulta
Dermatobranchus cf. albus
Dermatobranchus cf. diagonalis
Dermatobranchus cf. diagonalis
Dermatobranchus ornatus
Dermatobranchus ornatus
Dermatobranchus ornatus
Dermatobranchus sp.
Dermatobranchus sp.
Dermatobranchus sp.

Janolus



Janolus has a unique sensory organ, the caruncle, between the rhinophores. Branched bryozoans are their main food.

Janolus sp.
Janolus sp.

Bornella, Dendronotis, Scyllaeidae



Distinct, elongated rhinophore sheaths, as seen so clearly in Bornella anguilla characterise this group.

Like B. anguilla, both Crosslandia and Notobryon species can swim. The latter two genera feed on hydroids growing on the surface of brown algae and sea grass.

Bornella anguilla
Bornella anguilla
Bornella anguilla
Bornella anguilla
Dendronotus sp.
Crosslandia sp.
Notobryon sp.

Melibe



This genus of specialised crustacean feeders might not be so well known by divers if it were not for the spectacularly transparent M. colemani and M. engeli.

Most species can swim well. Those that are brown profit from symbiotic algae in the same way as Phyllodesmium species and corals.

Melibe colemanii
Melibe colemanii
Melibe colemanii on it
Melibe engeli
Melibe engeli on one of it
Melibe engeli
Melibe engeli
Melibe cf. engeli
Melibe viridis oral hood about to expand
Melibe viridis starting to expand oral hood
Melibe viridis with fully extended oral hood
Melibe viridis starting to with the oral hood
Melibe viridis
Melibe viridis view inside oral hood
Melibe viridis pulled right back
Melibe viridis spiral egg mass

Tritoniidae



Tritonia, Tritioniopsis and Marionia are the three genera in this family. Anatomically, the genera are quite distinct, but visually all three genera are fairly similar. They are specialist preditors on gorgonians, soft corals and sea pens.

Marionia sp. 13 (Gosliner et al 2018)
Marionia sp.
Marionia sp.
Tritonia sp
Tritoniopsis elegans

Dotidae



Doto and Kabeiro have nodular cerata. The Pancake Doto (Doto greenamyeri), so named because the cerata look like piles of pancakes has drawn the attention of many underwater photographers to this genus. They all seem to feed on hyroids, the Dotos that is!

Doto greenamyeri
Doto greenamyeri
Doto sp. 12 (Gosliner et. al. 2018)
Doto cf. ussi
Doto ussi laying eggs
Doto ussi head closeup
Doto ussi laying eggs

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Arminidae

Arminidae

Armina and Dendrobranchus are the two main genera in this family. There are a number of large and spectacular members in both genera. They all feed on sea pens or soft corals, or occasionally gorgonians.

Armina cf. occulta
Dermatobranchus cf. albus
Dermatobranchus cf. diagonalis
Dermatobranchus cf. diagonalis
Dermatobranchus ornatus
Dermatobranchus ornatus
Dermatobranchus ornatus
Dermatobranchus sp.
Dermatobranchus sp.
Dermatobranchus sp.

Janolus

Janolus

Janolus has a unique sensory organ, the caruncle, between the rhinophores. Branched bryozoans are their main food.

Janolus sp.
Janolus sp.

Bornella, Dendronotis, Scyllaeidae

Bornella, Dendronotis, Scyllaeidae

Distinct, elongated rhinophore sheaths, as seen so clearly in Bornella anguilla characterise this group.

Like B. anguilla, both Crosslandia and Notobryon species can swim. The latter two genera feed on hydroids growing on the surface of brown algae and sea grass.

Bornella anguilla
Bornella anguilla
Bornella anguilla
Bornella anguilla
Dendronotus sp.
Crosslandia sp.
Notobryon sp.

Melibe

Melibe

This genus of specialised crustacean feeders might not be so well known by divers if it were not for the spectacularly transparent M. colemani and M. engeli.

Most species can swim well. Those that are brown profit from symbiotic algae in the same way as Phyllodesmium species and corals.

Melibe colemanii
Melibe colemanii
Melibe colemanii on its host soft coral
Melibe engeli
Melibe engeli on one of its food algae
Melibe engeli
Melibe engeli
Melibe cf. engeli
Melibe viridis oral hood about to expand
Melibe viridis starting to expand oral hood
Melibe viridis with fully extended oral hood
Melibe viridis starting to with the oral hood
Melibe viridis
Melibe viridis view inside oral hood
Melibe viridis pulled right back
Melibe viridis spiral egg mass

Tritoniidae

Tritoniidae

Tritonia, Tritioniopsis and Marionia are the three genera in this family. Anatomically, the genera are quite distinct, but visually all three genera are fairly similar. They are specialist preditors on gorgonians, soft corals and sea pens.

Marionia sp. 13 (Gosliner et al 2018)
Marionia sp.
Marionia sp.
Tritonia sp
Tritoniopsis elegans

Dotidae

Dotidae

Doto and Kabeiro have nodular cerata. The Pancake Doto (Doto greenamyeri), so named because the cerata look like piles of pancakes has drawn the attention of many underwater photographers to this genus. They all seem to feed on hyroids.

Doto greenamyeri
Doto greenamyeri
Doto sp. 12 (Gosliner et. al. 2018)
Doto cf. ussi
Doto ussi laying eggs
Doto ussi head closeup
Doto ussi laying eggs