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Nudibranchs

Cephalaspidea

Cephalaspidea



Index

Sea Slugs



Side-Gilled

Side-Gilled Slugs

Umbrella Shells

Umbrella Shells

Head-shield Slugs

Head-shield Slugs

Pteropods

Pteropods

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Sea Hares

Sea Hares

Nudibranchs



Phanerobranch Dorids

Side-Gilled Slugs

Cryptobranch Discodorids

Cryptobranch Discodorids

Cryptobranch Chromodorids

Cryptobranch Chromodorids

Radula-less Dorids

Radula-less Dorids

Arminids

Arminids

Dendronotids

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Aeolids

Aeolids

Head-shield Slugs and Bat-winged Slugs are often small. The Bat-wings are have bizarre shapes and are often brighly coloured. Their wings are effectively used for swimming. Some Head-Shielded Slugs have a shell as in Bulla .

Haminoeidae



Members of the family have a thinly calcified shell. All are small to very small, and herbivorous. Duirnal species are often brightly coloured.

The smallest of these have benn nick-named mini-hams. Clay Carlson (from Guam) first made the sea slug world aware of them 20 years ago and there are about 8 species presently recognised. They are all tiny yet have extraordinarily long tails many times the length of the shell. Presumably these tails are prehensile because they all live on and feed on filamentous Cyanobacteria (Lyngbya spp). Their radula is unique because the two halves are asymmetrical, instead of symmetrical like all other molluscs. At some point they may be moved to a genus of their own.

Haminoea sp.
Haminoea sp. with eggs
Haminoea "miniham group" on their food algae

Aglajidae



Shell reduced and internal. The head-shield is broad with the leading edge sporting many sensory cilia which are used for detecting prey. These can be clearly seen in the image of Chelidoneura elegans. They are all predators on a range of organisms, dependant on the species.

Chelidoneura amoena
Chelidoneura elegans showing the oral papillae
Chelidoneura elegans
Chelidoneura hirundinina
Chelidoneura hirundinina
Mariaglaja inornata
Mariaglaja sandrana
Stacks Image 2509
Phillinopsis lineolata
Philinopsis speciosa

Colpodaspidae & Gastropteridae



Colpodaspis has a small internal shell and a long appendatge on their right side. They are all just a few millimeters long. Almost nothing is know about their biology, but they move quickly, suggesting that they may be hunters.

Gastropteron, Sagaminopteron and Siphopteron are all small to very small, colourful head-shield slugs that can swim by flapping their parapodia. This gives them the common name "Bat-winged Slugs". Some feed on sponges, while others are probably generalist feeders.

Sagaminopteon psychedelicum is most often seen by divers, Its' white/pink body is covered in large black-edged bright-orange polkadots.

Colpodaspis sp.
Colpodaspis sp.
Sagaminopteron psychedelicum
Sagaminopteron psychedelicum
Sagaminopteron sp.
Siphopteron cf. tigrinum
Siphenopteron cf. citrinum
Siphenopteron cf. citrinum
Siphenopteron flavolineolatum

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Haminoeidae

Haminoeidae

Members of the family have a thinly calcified shell. All are small to very small, and herbivorous. Duirnal species are often brightly coloured.

The smallest of these have benn nick-named mini-hams. Clay Carlson (from Guam) first made the sea slug world aware of them 20 years ago and there are about 8 species presently recognised. They are all tiny yet have extraordinarily long tails many times the length of the shell. Presumably these tails are prehensile because they all live on and feed on filamentous Cyanobacteria (Lyngbya spp). Their radula is unique because the two halves are asymmetrical, instead of symmetrical like all other molluscs. At some point they may be moved to a genus of their own.

Haminoea sp.
Haminoea sp. with eggs
Haminoea "miniham group" on their food algae

Aglajidae

Aglajidae

Shell reduced and internal. The head-shield is broad with the leading edge sporting many sensory cilia which are used for detecting prey. These can be clearly seen in the image of Chelidoneura elegans. They are all predators on a range of organisms, dependant on the species.

Chelidoneura amoena
Chelidoneura elegans showing the oral papillae
Chelidoneura elegans
Chelidoneura hirundinina
Chelidoneura hirundinina
Mariaglaja inornata
Mariaglaja sandrana
Phillinopsis lineolata
Philinopsis speciosa

Colpodaspidae & Gastropteridae

Colpodaspidae & Gastropteridae

Colpodaspis has a small internal shell and a long appendatge on their right side. They are all just a few millimeters long. Almost nothing is know about their biology, but they move quickly, suggesting that they may be hunters.

Gastropteron, Sagaminopteron and Siphopteron are all small to very small, colourful head-shield slugs that can swim by flapping their parapodia. This gives them the common name "Bat-winged Slugs". Some feed on sponges, while others are probably generalist feeders.

Sagaminopteon psychedelicum is most often seen by divers, Its' white/pink body is covered in large black-edged bright-orange polkadots.

Colpodaspis sp.
Colpodaspis sp.
Sagaminopteron psychedelicum
Sagaminopteron psychedelicum
Sagaminopteron sp.
Siphopteron cf. tigrinum
Siphenopteron cf. citrinum
Siphenopteron cf. citrinum
Siphenopteron flavolineolatum