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Angels & Damsels!

Angelfish, Anenomefish & Damsels



Fish Index

Fish



Sharks & Rays

Sharks & Rays

Anenome Fish

Anenome Fish

Anthias

Fairy Basslets

Angelfish

Angelfish

Batfish

Batfish

Barracuda & Travallies

Barracuda

Box-, File-& Pufferfiish

Box-, File-& Triggerfiosh

Blennies

Blennies

Butterflyfish

Butterflyfish

Cardinalfish

Cardinalfish

Dartfish

Dartfish

Dragonets

Dragonetes

Dottybacks

Dottybacks

Eels

Eels

Flatfish

Flatfish

Frogfish

Frogfish & Toadfish

Gobies

Gobies

Ghost Pipefish

Ghostpipefish

Hawkfish

Hawkfish

Jawfish

Jawfish

Sand-Divers

Sand-Divers

Scorpionfish

Seahorse

Seahorses

Seahorse

Snappers

Snapper

Surgeonfish

Surgeonfish

Sweetlips

Sweetlips

Triggerfish

Triggerfiish

Wrasse

Wrasse

Angelfish are well known to divers because of the large size of several species and flambouyant colours. They are most closely related to butterflyfish, but are included here due the superficial similarity of some small species to the damsels.

Anenomefish are amongst the best known of all reef fish due their colours, habits and publicity. Damselfish include the anenomefish and have complex family lives.

These groups are yet again totally dependant not only for the shelter reefs give them, but also for the range of food the infinite number of habitats reefs provide. Anything that impacts the reef, puts the angels and damsels on the knife-edge of survival.

Angelfish



Although these mostly flambouyant fish are cirumtropical, 85% of the species are Indopacific. Generally they are territorial, one male living with a single or small group of females. They are very dependant on shelter provided by the reef.

Mating takes place around sunset, and the eggs float to the surface. After a few tens of days the planktonic larvae settle. Juvenile Pomacanthus have striking black, white and purple patterns, quite different from the adults.

The smaller Centropygne species are shy and skittish. They feed mostly on algae. Large angelfish primarily eat sponges suplimented by a variety of other prey. Lamarck's Angelfish (Genicanthus lamarck) tends to swim in loose groups midwater as well as close to reefs. They feed mostly on zooplankton.

Apolemichthys trimaculatus
Apolemichthys trimaculatus
Apolemichthys trimaculatus - colour form
Centropyge bicolor
Centropyge bicolor
Centropyge bispinosa
Centropyge bispinosa - juvenile
Chaetodontoplus mesoleucas
Chaetodontoplus mesoleucas
Centropyge multifasciata
Centropyge multifasciata
Centropyge tibicen
Centropyge tibicen - ?juvenile
Centropyge vroliki
Centropyge vroliki
Genicanthus lamarck - female
Genicanthus lamarck - male
Pygoplites diacanthus
Pygoplites diacanthus
Pygoplites diacanthus

Large Angelfish



Pomacanthus, the genus of very large angelfish is split out here just to make it easier to get an overview of the species.

Divers hearing loud grunting noises during dive know that they have suddenly frightened a Pomacanthus imperator or P. navarchus into flight!

Pomacanthus annularis
Pomacanthus semicirculatus
Pomacanthus semicirculatus
Pomacanthus imperator
Pomacanthus imperator
 Pomacanthus imperator - juvenile
Pomacanthus imperator - subadult
Pomacanthus navarchus
Pomacanthus navarchus
Pomacanthus sexstriatus
Pomacanthus sexstriatus
Pomacanthus sexstriatus feeding on sponges
Pomacanthus xanthometopon
Pomacanthus xanthometopon
Pomacanthus xanthometopon

Anenomefish



These are just two genera of Damselfish that have a commensal relationship with certain large sea anenomes. They live as pairs or small family groups in an anenome with a dominant female an one or more smaller males. The eggs are laid on bare rock or other well-cleaned surface close to the anenome and guarded agressively by the parents.

The Saddleback Anenomefish (Amphiprion polymnus)is, gram for gram, probably the most agressive fish of the reef, following divers easily up to 2 meters from the nests and bite chunks of skin out of divers hands. They are luckily only 12 cm long.

Anenomefish are not the only fish to live together with anenomes. Bangai Cardinalfish (Pterapogon kauderni), paricularly young individuals live commensally with some of the same anenome species as Anenomefish. The cardinalfish Neamia octospina livesdeep between the highly toxic tentacles of Phyllodiscus anenomes.

The film "Finding Nemo", while making people aware of coral reefs, had a disastrous impact on anenomefish. They were almost exterminated from Philippine reefs and Indonesion populations were badly impacted. Of the small percent that survived transport, many were "set free" by children throwing them into a toilet to set them free, dying as all there blood cells exploded in freshwater.

Amphiprion clarkii
Amphiprion clarkii
Amphiprion clarkii
Amphiprion clarkii
Amphiprion melanopus
Amphiprion melanopus
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris - eggs
Amphiprion ocellaris - eggs
Amphiprion pacificus
Amphiprion pacificus
Amphiprion perideraion
Amphiprion perideraion
 Amphiprion perideraion
Amphiprion perideraion
Amphiprion polymnus guarding eggs
Amphiprion polymnus eggs
Amphiprion cf. leucokranos
Premnas biaculeatus
Premnas biaculeatus
Premnas biaculeatus - male
Premnas biaculeatus - female
Premnas biaculeatus - large female, small male

Damselfish



Only gobies have more species than damselfish. Most are found in the Indopacific region. Many are dull coloured, but have juvenile stages with spectacular colours and pattern.

Sergeants (Abudefduf sp.) are schooling and have mass egg-laying events where the eggs are fastened on rocks close to reefs. The adults try to protect the eggs, but these mass events attract large numbers of angelfish, wrasse and butterflyfish who feast on the bounty of eggs.

Various species of Chromis form large schools well above reefs. The juveniles of others, and Dascyllus live in groups amongst the protection of branches of Acropora corals.

All are day-active, and the non-schooling species highly territorial. Egg-laying sites are on bare rock, a shell, or other smooth surface that can be well cleaned of algae. Once the eggs are laid, both parents guard the brood closely.

Abudefduf vaigiensis - with eggs
Abudefduf vaigiensis eggs
Acanthochromis polyacanthus - juveniles
Amblyglyphidodon aureus
Chromis cf. viridis spawning colouration
Chrysiptera bleekeri
Chrysiptera rex
Chrysiptera springeri
Chrysiptera springeri
Dasyllus melanurus
Dasyllus sp. - juvenile
Neopomacentrus bankieri
Neoglyphidodon crossi - juvenile
Neoglyphidodon nigroris - bicolour form
Neoglyphidodon nigroris - juvenile
Neoglyphidodon thoracotaeniatus
Neoglyphidodon thoracotaeniatus - juvenile
Plectroglyphididon dickii
Plectroglphidodon lacrymatus
Pomocentrus alleni
Pomacentrus auriventris
Pomacentrus coelestis
Pomacentrus simsiang
Pomacentrus sp.
Pomacentrus vaiuli
Pomacentrus vaiuli

Help Save Reefs!



The organisations that work to protect coral reefs and our oceans need as much support as they can get. Check out:

If you are a diver, and especially if you are an underwater photographer, donate. If you do nothing, there will be nothing to dive on and nothing to photograph.

These are suggestions, but not endorsements of the suggested organisations. It is your responsibility to review and check the charities you wish to donate to.

Angelfish

Angelfish

Although these mostly flambouyant fish are cirumtropical, 85% of the species are Indopacific. Generally they are territorial, one male living with a single or small group of females. They are very dependant on shelter provided by the reef.

Mating takes place around sunset, and the eggs float to the surface. After a few tens of days the planktonic larvae settle. Juvenile Pomacanthus have striking black, white and purple patterns, quite different from the adults.

The smaller Centropygne species are shy and skittish. They feed mostly on algae. Large angelfish primarily eat sponges suplimented by a variety of other prey. Lamarck's Angelfish (Genicanthus lamarck) tends to swim in loose groups midwater as well as close to reefs. They feed mostly on zooplankton.

Apolemichthys trimaculatus
Apolemichthys trimaculatus
Centropyge bicolor
Centropyge bispinosa
Centropyge bispinosa - juvenile
Chaetodontoplus mesoleucas
Centropyge multifasciata
Centropyge tibicen
Centropyge tibicen - ?juvenile
Centropyge vroliki
Centropyge vroliki
Genicanthus lamarck - female
Genicanthus lamarck - male
Pygoplites diacanthus

Large Angelfish

Large Angelfish

Pomacanthus, the genus of very large angelfish is split out here just to make it easier to get an overview of the species.

Divers hearing loud grunting noises during dive know that they have suddenly frightened a Pomacanthus imperator or P. navarchus into flight!

Pomacanthus annularis
Pomacanthus semicirculatus
Pomacanthus semicirculatus
Pomacanthus imperator
Pomacanthus imperator
Pomacanthus imperator - juvenile
Pomacanthus imperator - subadult
Pomacanthus navarchus
Pomacanthus navarchus
Pomacanthus sexstriatus
Pomacanthus sexstriatus
Pomacanthus sexstriatus feeding on sponges
Pomacanthus xanthometopon
Pomacanthus xanthometopon
Pomacanthus xanthometopon

Anenomefish

Anenomefish

These are just two genera of Damselfish that have a commensal relationship with certain large sea anenomes. They live as pairs or small family groups in an anenome with a dominant female an one or more smaller males. The eggs are laid on bare rock or other well-cleaned surface close to the anenome and guarded agressively by the parents.

The Saddleback Anenomefish (Amphiprion polymnus)is, gram for gram, probably the most agressive fish of the reef, following divers easily up to 2 meters from the nests and bite chunks of skin out of divers hands. They are luckily only 12 cm long.

Anenomefish are not the only fish to live together with anenomes. Bangai Cardinalfish (Pterapogon kauderni), paricularly young individuals live commensally with some of the same anenome species as Anenomefish. The cardinalfish Neamia octospina livesdeep between the highly toxic tentacles of Phyllodiscus anenomes.

The film "Finding Nemo", while making people aware of coral reefs, had a disastrous impact on anenomefish. They were almost exterminated from Philippine reefs and Indonesion populations were badly impacted. Of the small percent that survived transport, many were "set free" by children throwing them into a toilet to set them free, dying as all there blood cells exploded in freshwater.

Amphiprion clarkii
Amphiprion clarkii
Amphiprion clarkii
Amphiprion melanopus
Amphiprion melanopus
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris
Amphiprion ocellaris - eggs
Amphiprion pacificus
Amphiprion perideraion
Amphiprion perideraion
Amphiprion perideraion
Amphiprion polymnus guarding eggs
Amphiprion cf. leucokranos
Premnas biaculeatus
Premnas biaculeatus - male
Premnas biaculeatus - female
Premnas biaculeatus - large female, small male

Damselfish

Damselfish

Only gobies have more species than damselfish. Most are found in the Indopacific region. Many are dull coloured, but have juvenile stages with spectacular colours and pattern.

Sergeants (Abudefduf sp.) are schooling and have mass egg-laying events where the eggs are fastened on rocks close to reefs. The adults try to protect the eggs, but these mass events attract large numbers of angelfish, wrasse and butterflyfish who feast on the bounty of eggs.

Various species of Chromis form large schools well above reefs. The juveniles of others, and Dascyllus live in groups amongst the protection of branches of Acropora corals.

All are day-active, and the non-schooling species highly territorial. Egg-laying sites are on bare rock, a shell, or other smooth surface that can be well cleaned of algae. Once the eggs are laid, both parents guard the brood closely.

Abudefduf vaigiensis - with eggs
Abudefduf vaigiensis eggs
Acanthochromis polyacanthus - juveniles
Amblyglyphidodon aureus
Chromis cf. viridis spawning colouration
Chrysiptera bleekeri
 Chrysiptera rex
Chrysiptera springeri
Chrysiptera springer
Dasyllus melanurus
Dasyllus sp. - juvenile
Neopomacentrus bankieri
Neoglyphidodon crossi - juvenile
Neoglyphidodon nigroris - bicolour form
Neoglyphidodon nigroris - juvenile
Neoglyphidodon thoracotaeniatus
Neoglyphidodon thoracotaeniatus - juvenile
Plectroglyphididon dickii
Plectroglphidodon lacrymatus
Pomocentrus alleni
Pomacentrus auriventris
Pomacentrus coelestis
Pomacentrus simsiang
Pomacentrus sp.
Pomacentrus vaiuli
Pomacentrus vaiuli