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Nudibranchs

Cryptobranch Chromodorids

Cryptobranch Dorid Nudibranchs



Index

Sea Slugs



Side-Gilled

Side-Gilled Slugs

Umbrella Shells

Umbrella Shells

Head-shield Slugs

Head-shield Slugs

Pteropods

Pteropods

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Sea Hares

Sea Hares

Nudibranchs



Phanerobranch Dorids

Side-Gilled Slugs

Cryptobranch Discodorids

Cryptobranch Discodorids

Cryptobranch Chromodorids

Cryptobranch Chromodorids

Radula-less Dorids

Radula-less Dorids

Arminids

Arminids

Dendronotids

Sap-Sucking Slugs

Aeolids

Aeolids

This is the largest family in the Indo-Pacific and includes many of the most colourful nudibranchs.

New scientific research showed that many species had been placed in the wrong genera. Only the most recent identification guides reflect the new order.

Many of the commonly seen genera are in this family, e.g. Chromodoris, Goniobranchus, Mexichromis, Glossodoris, Doroprismatica, Hypselodoris, Ceratosoma.

Chromodoris



This is the genus that contains the brightly coloured Pajama nudibranch. Flat egg masses are characteristic.

Chromodoris annae
Chromodoris dianae
Chromodoris cf. elisabethina
Chromodoris elisbethina
Chromodoris lochi
Chromodoris lochi
Chromodoris lochi
Chromodoris cf. lochi
Chromodoris lineolata
Chromodoris preciosa
Chromodoris strigata
Chromodoris strigata
Chromodoris willani
Chromodoris willani
Chromodoris sp. 7 (Gosliner et al. 2018)

Goniobranchus



Many species can be quite large as in G. reticulatus. The egg masses are attach to the bottom along their narrow edges.

Behaviour helps the identification of some species. Raising and lowering the mantle around the head is characteristic of e.g. G. hintuanensis, while very active mantle flapping is seen in the species related to G. kuniei.

Another group is characterised by a fairly evenly coloured mantle, often white or yellow, with distinctive coloured marginal bands.

Goniobranchus  cf. albonares
Goniobrachus cf. aureopurpureus
Goniobranchus cf. aureopurpurea
Glossodoris bonwanga
Goniobranchus coi
Goniobranchus coi juvenile
Goniobranchus coi
Goniobranchus collingwoodi
Goniobranchus fidelis
Goniobranchus geometricus
Goniobranchus geometricus
Goniobrnchus hintuanensis with eggs
Goniobranchus kuniei
Goniobranchus kuniei - closeup of oral tentacles
Goniobranchus kuniei
Goniobranchus kuniei
Goniobranchus leopardu
Goniobranchus preciosus
Goniobranchus reticulatus
Goniobranchus reticulatus
Goniobranchus reticulatus
Goniobranchus sp. 25 (Gosliner et. al. 2018)
Goniobranchus sp. 42 (Gosliner et al. 2018)
Goniobranchus cf. verrieri

Ardeadoris & Glossodoris



These tend to be fairly large nudbranchs with an undulate mantle edge. G. cincta is most often noticed by non-specialist divers in SE Asia. The egg ribbons are laid in spirals, fastened to the substrate on their narrow edge.

Ardeadoris is closely related to Glossodoris. The mantle undulations are less flexible and teh background colour of the mantle is generally white.

Areadoris angustolutea
Ardeadoris cruenta
Ardeadoris egretta
Glossodoris cf. alderi
Glossodoris cincta
Glossodoris cincta
Glossodoris cincta laying eggs
Glossodoris pallida
Glossodoris pallida
Glossodoris pallida
Glossodoris rufomarginata
Glossodoris rufomarginata
Glossodoris sp.

Doroprismatica



Doroprismatica have fairly rigid undulated mantle margins,and tend to be narrower relative to their length in contrast to Glossodoris.

In SE Asia, the black D. stellata covered in thousands of white spots is often seen feeding on Elephant Ear sponges (Ianthella basta). Egg-masses are generally laid on the underside of the sponges.

Doroprismatica atromarginata with Gnathophyllum americanum
Doroprismatica atromarginata
Doroprismatica balut
Doroprismatica balut
Doroprismatica balut
Doroprismatica stellatus
Doroprismatica stellatus eggs

Hypselodoris



Hypselodoris is charaacterised by a a body that is relatively high in relation to the width as can be seen in the photo of H. bullocki. See Gosliner et al. (2018) for details on the groupings within the genus.

Hypselodoris apolegma
Hypselodoris bullocki
Hypselodoris decorata
Hypselodoris emma
Hypselodoris iba
Hypselodoris iba
Hypselodoris cf. iba
Hypselodoris infucata
Hypselodris infucata
Hypselodoris infurcata
Hypselodoris cf. juniperae
Hypselodoris katherinae
Hypselodoris maculosa
Hypselodoris maridadilus
Hypselodorus purpureomaculosa
Hypselodoris sp.
Hypselodoris tyroni
Hypselodoris tyroni
Hypselodoris whitei

Ceratosoma-Miamira



Ceratosoma and Miamara used to be considered a single genus, but a genetically quite distinct.

Ceratosome are generally quite large with the posterior part of the mantle narrowed, stiff, and arched over the gills for protection. C. trilobatum is large enough to offer space for hitch-hiking Emperor Shrimps.

Miamira species are bizarrly shaped and often brightly coloured.

Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue gills
Ceratosoma tenue rhinphores
Ceratosoma trilobatum
Ceratosoma trilobatum
Ceratosoma trilobatum
Ceratosoma trilobatum
Ceratosoma trilobatum juvenile
Ceratosoma sp. 1 (Gosliner et al. 2018)
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata pairing

Chromodoridae - misc. genera



Mexichromis, Verconia, Diversidoris, and Thorunna are covered here.

Diversidoris flava
Mexichromis multituberculata
Mexichromis multituberculata
Mexichromis trilineata
Thorunna cf. danieliae
Thorunna cf. florens
Thorunna halourga with eggs
Thorunna florens
Thorunna sp.
Verconia alboannulata
Verconia cf. romeri
Verconia sp.

Chromodoris

Chromodoris

This is the genus that contains the brightly coloured Pajama nudibranch. Flat egg masses are characteristic.

Chromodoris annae
Chromodoris dianae
Chromodoris cf. elisabethina
Chromodoris elisbethina
Chromodoris lochi
Chromodoris lochi
Chromodoris lochi
Chromodoris cf. lochi
Chromodoris lineolata
Chromodoris preciosa
Chromodoris strigata
Chromodoris strigata
Chromodoris willani
Chromodoris willani
Chromodoris sp. 7 (Gosliner et al. 2018)

Goniobranchus

Goniobranchus

Many species can be quite large as in G. reticulatus. The egg masses are attach to the bottom along their narrow edges.

Behaviour helps the identification of some species. Raising and lowering the mantle around the head is characteristic of e.g. G. hintuanensis, while very active mantle flapping is seen in the species related to G. kuniei.

Another group is characterised by a fairly evenly coloured mantle, often white or yellow, with distinctive coloured marginal bands.

Goniobranchus  cf. albonares
Goniobrachus cf. aureopurpureus
Goniobranchus cf. aureopurpurea
Glossodoris bonwanga
Goniobranchus coi
Goniobranchus coi juvenile
Goniobranchus coi
Goniobranchus collingwoodi
Goniobranchus fidelis
Goniobranchus geometricus
Goniobrnchus hintuanensis with eggs
Goniobranchus kuniei
Goniobranchus kuniei - closeup of oral tentacles
Goniobranchus kuniei
Goniobranchus leopardus
Goniobranchus preciosus
Goniobranchus reticulatus
Goniobranchus reticulatus
Goniobranchus sp. 25 (Gosliner et. al. 2018)
Goniobranchus cf. verrieri

Ardeadoris & Glossodoris

Ardeadoris & Glossodoris

These tend to be fairly large nudbranchs with an undulate mantle edge. G. cincta is most often noticed by non-specialist divers in SE Asia. The egg ribbons are laid in spirals, fastened to the substrate on their narrow edge.

Ardeadoris is closely related to Glossodoris. The mantle undulations are less flexible and teh background colour of the mantle is generally white.

Areadoris angustolutea
Ardeadoris egretta
Ardeadoris cruenta
Glossodoris cf. alderi
Glossodoris cincta
Glossodoris cincta
Glossodoris pallida
Glossodoris pallida
Glossodoris pallida
Glossodoris rufomarginata
Glossodoris rufomarginata
Glossodoris sp.

Doroprismatica

Doroprismatica

Doroprismatica have fairly rigid undulated mantle margins,and tend to be narrower relative to their length in contrast to Glossodoris.

In SE Asia, the black D. stellata covered in thousands of white spots is often seen feeding on Elephant Ear sponges (Ianthella basta). Egg-masses are generally laid on the underside of the sponges.

Doroprismatica atromarginata with Gnathophyllum americanum
Doroprismatica atromarginata
Doroprismatica balut
Doroprismatica balut
Doroprismatica balut
Doroprismatica stellatus
Doroprismatica stellatus eggs

Hypselodoris

Hypselodoris

Hypselodoris is characterised by a a body that is relatively high in relation to the width as can be seen in the photo of H. bullocki. See Gosliner et al. (2018) for details on the groupings within the genus.

Hypselodoris apolegma
Hypselodoris bullocki
Hypselodoris decorata
Hypselodoris emma
Hypselodoris iba
Hypselodoris iba
Hypselodoris cf. iba
Hypselodoris infucata
Hypselodris infucata
Hypselodoris infurcata
Hypselodoris cf. juniperae
Hypselodoris katherinae
Hypselodoris maculosa
Hypselodoris maridadilus
Hypselodorus purpureomaculosa
Hypselodoris sp.
Hypselodoris tyroni
Hypselodoris tyroni
Hypselodoris whitei

Ceratosoma-Miamira

Ceratosoma-Miamira

Ceratosoma and Miamara used to be considered a single genus, but a genetically quite distinct.

Ceratosome are generally quite large with the posterior part of the mantle narrowed, stiff, and arched over the gills for protection. C. trilobatum is large enough to offer space for hitch-hiking Emperor Shrimps.

Miamira species are bizarrly shaped and often brightly coloured.

Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue
Ceratosoma tenue gills
Ceratosoma tenue rhinphores
Ceratosoma trilobatum
Ceratosoma trilobatum
Ceratosoma trilobatum
Ceratosoma trilobatum juvenile
Ceratosoma sp. 1 (Gosliner et al. 2018)
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata
Miamira sinuata pairing

Chromodoridae - misc. genera

Chromodoridae - misc. genera

Mexichromis, Verconia, Diversidoris, and Thorunna are covered here.

Diversidoris flava
Mexichromis multituberculata
Mexichromis multituberculata
Mexichromis trilineata
Thorunna cf. danieliae
Thorunna cf. florens
Thorunna halourga with eggs
Thorunna florens
Thorunna sp.
Verconia sp.
Verconia cf. romeri
Verconia sp.

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